Steven M. Cohen

Steven M. Cohen is a Fellow of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs and Research Professor of Jewish Social Policy at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and Director of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at NYU Wagner. In the past, he served as Professor at The Melton Centre for Jewish Education at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and was Professor of Sociology at Queens College.

Publications by Steven M. Cohen

JTS Rabbis and Israel, Then and Now: The 2011 Survey of JTS Ordained Rabbis and Current Students

JTS Rabbis and Israel, Then and Now: The 2011 Survey of JTS Ordained Rabbis and Current Students by Steven M. Cohen

Highly Engaged Young American Jews: Contrasts in Generational Ethos

Many engaged Jews under the age of forty emphasize, more than their elders and predecessors, Jewish purpose. They have created new minyanim, expanded social justice activities, engaged in various cultural endeavors, undertaken Judaic learning singly and in groups, and established a powerful and significant presence on the Internet and other new media. Read More »

Changes in American Jewish Identities: From Normative Constructions to Aesthetic Understandings

Over the past several decades, Jews in the United States have been reshaping their Jewish identities in line with geographic dispersion, cultural changes, and generational shifts. Of special note is that Jews have fewer Jewish spouses, friends, neighbors, coworkers, and formal ties to other Jews. They feel less attached to both Jewish peoplehood and Israel, amounting to a decline in Jewish collective identity. Read More »

The Sovereign Self: Jewish Identity in Post-Modern America

I remember at my bat mitzvah having a thought, a prayer, and saying: Let me never leave this. I also remember being surprised, because that was a time when I couldn’t imagine Judaism not being important to me–it was almost like knowing what was coming. I remember thinking it and being surprised I was thinking it.
–Molly
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The Sovereign Self: Jewish Identity in Post-Modern America

I remember at my bat mitzvah having a thought, a prayer, and saying: Let me never leave this. I also remember being surprised, because that was a time when I couldn’t imagine Judaism not being important to me–it was almost like knowing what was coming. I remember thinking it and being surprised I was thinking it.

Read More »

Religion and the Public Square: Attitudes of American Jews in Comparative Perspective – Part Two

Attitudes toward separation-accommodation are related to support for (or opposition to) the expression of religion in public life. Within each of the three samples, church-state separationists were more likely than accommodationists to oppose expanded religious influence in society and the involvement of churches and church leaders in political affairs. Read More »

RELIGION AND THE PUBLIC SQUARE: ATTITUDES OF AMERICAN JEWS IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE – PART ONE

The Historical Context / “Separationism” vs. “Religious Accommodation” / Is Jewish Separationism Waning? / Questions for Research / Measures of Jewish Involvement / Religion in the Schools Read More »

The Impact of Denomination: Differences in the Israel-Related Opinions of American Rabbis and Jewish Communal Workers

Jewish professional communal leaders differ from the Jewish public in that they are more Jewishly knowledgeable, involved, and committed. This study reports on survey data collected in 1987 from these leaders? American rabbis and Jewish communal workers ? subdivided along denominational lines. It confirms the near demise of any distinctive position of communal workers and underlines the importance of denominational or religious identity as a variable in predicting attitudes toward Israel. Analyzed
areas of behavior include frequency of travel to Israel and contact with Israelis. Attitudes investigated dealt with Zionist commitment, Israeli foreign policy and political personalities, the acceptability of public criticism of Israel, and religious pluralism. Read More »

What are the Professional Leaders of American Jewry Thinking About Israel?