Rivkah Fishman-Duker

Rivkah Fishman-Duker is a Lecturer Emerita in Ancient Jewish History at the Rothberg International School of the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

Publications by Rivkah Fishman-Duker

Tuvia Tenenbom, The Lies They Tell: A Journey through America

Tenenbom’s format remains that of brief interviews with the different people whom he encounters, and general observations following these meetings. Read More »

Tricia Miller, Jews and Anti-Judaism in Esther and the Church

Anti-Judaism in the different versions of the book of Esther; the interpretation of Esther by Christian thinkers; and the hatred of Jews, Zionism and Israel Read More »

Geoffrey Herman, A Prince without a Kingdom

A Prince without a Kingdom, by Geoffrey Herman, Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism, 150, Tuebingen, Germany: Mohr Siebeck, 2012, 411 pp. Read More »

Unbroken Spirit: A Heroic Story of Faith, Courage and Survival, by Yosef Mendelevich

More than twenty years ago, the Soviet Union fell and its control over Eastern Europe ended. Read More »

Rivkah Fishman-Duker on A Murder among Friends: Uri Avnery – A Story of Political Warfare by Amnon Lord

Jewish Political Studies Review 23:1-2 (Spring 2011)    Who Is Uri Avnery? Uri Avnery, octogenarian icon of Israel’s cultural and political left, is indeed a worthy subject of a serious study. Better known in Europe than in the United States, Avnery […] Read More »

Rivkah Fishman-Duker on The World Turned Upside Down: The Global Battle over God, Truth, and Power, by Melanie Phillips

Reason, the West, the Jews, and Their Defamers

The World Turned Upside Down: The Global Battle over God, Truth, and Power, by Melanie Phillips, Encounter Books, 2010, 457 pp.
Reviewed by Rivkah Fishman-Duker Read More »

Rivkah Fishman-Duker on How Jewish Is Jewish History?

How Jewish Is Jewish History? by Moshe Rosman, Littman Library
of Jewish Civilization, 2007, 220 pp.
Reviewed by Rivkah Fishman-Duker Read More »

Rivkah Fishman-Duker on The Aryan Jesus: Christian Theologians and the Bible in Nazi Germany

Nazis for Jesus/Jesus for Nazis
The Aryan Jesus: Christian Theologians and the Bible in Nazi Germany by Susannah Heschel. Princeton University Press, 2008, 339 pp.
Reviewed by Rivkah Fishman-Duker Read More »

“Jerusalem: Capital of the Jews”:
The Jewish Identity of Jerusalem in Greek and Roman Sources

For ancient Greek and Roman pagan authors, Jerusalem definitely was a Jewish city. This article draws on references to Jerusalem from nearly twenty different sources, dating from the third century BCE to the third century CE, which are included in the late Professor Menahem Stern’s comprehensive anthology, Greek and Latin Authors on Jews and Judaism. An examination of these texts indicates the unanimous agreement that Jerusalem was Jewish by virtue of the fact that its inhabitants were Jews, it Read More »

Rivkah Fishman-Duker on Rome and Jerusalem: The Clash of Ancient Civilizations, by Martin Goodman

The Challenge of Ancient Judaism
Rome and Jerusalem: The Clash of Ancient Civilizations, by Martin Goodman, London, Penguin Books, 2007, 639 pp.
Reviewed by Rivkah Fishman-Duker Read More »

Rivkah Duker Fishman on The Oslo Years: A Mother’s Journey

An Underground View of Oslo
The Oslo Years: A Mother’s Journey, by Ellen Horowitz, I.I. Creations (distributed by Gefen Publishing), 2005, 284 pp.
Reviewed by Rivkah Duker Fishman Read More »

Rivkah Duker Fishman on The Man of Vision: The Ultra-Orthodox Ideology of Rabbi Shach

The Worldview of Rabbi Eleazar Schach
The Man of Vision: The Ultra-Orthodox Ideology of Rabbi Shach (Ish Ha-Hashkafah: Ha-Ideologia Ha-Haredit al pi HaRav Shach), by Avishay Ben Haim, Mosaica Publishers, 179 pp. [in Hebrew].
Reviewed by Rivkah Duker Fishman Read More »

Perspectives – The Seventh-Century Christian Obsession with the Jews: A Historical Parallel for the Present?

In the seventh century, the Arabs embarked on the conquest of the world in the name of Islam. The Caliphate replaced the Persian Empire and Christian Spain and conquered much of the Byzantine Empire. The latter, however, seemed to ignore the threat of the new invaders and their religion. Instead, the Byzantine political and intellectual elite focused increasingly on the Jews in tracts and legal measures. The situation has certain parallels with the present.
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