Jonathan Fox

Jonathan Fox received his Ph.D. in government and politics from the University of Maryland in 1997. He is currently a senior lecturer in the Political Studies Department of Bar Ilan University and a fellow in the Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies. He specializes in the influence of religion on politics.

Publications by Jonathan Fox

Are Some Religions More Conflict-Prone Than Others?

This article focuses on the question of whether some religions are more conflict prone than others. There are several schools of thought on the topic, most of which focus on Islam. First some, like Samuel Huntington, argue that Islam is becoming increasingly violent in comparison to other religions. Second are those, like Daniel Pipes, who argue that some but not all Muslims are more violent. Read More »

CIVILIZATIONAL, RELIGIOUS, AND NATIONAL EXPLANATIONS FOR ETHNIC REBELLION IN THE POST-COLD WAR MIDDLE EAST

Samuel Huntington’s “clash of civilizations” thesis, if nothing else, has sparked a debate over the nature of conflict in the post Cold War era. Huntington predicts that future conflict, including conflict in the Middle East, will be mostly between civilizations. However, many disagree and variously predict that conflict in general will decline or that it will continue to be fought along more traditional lines. Two traditional bases for ethnic conflict that are particularly relevant to the Middle East are religion and nationalism. Accordingly, this study assesses the comparative im pact of civilization, religion, and nationalism on ethnic rebellion in the Middle East. The results show that both conflict in general and civilizational conflict in particular in the Middle East dropped significantly after the end of the Cold War, thus contradicting Huntington’s theory. Read More »